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I made this question. I just read this. Doesn't the latter apply to my question?

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    No it does not. Good is not objective nor is quality as people like differt voices sounds and the vocies fit different niches. For example on your question I may not like the sound of the voice so your whole question would go out the window then. – Dom Aug 2 '17 at 11:47
  • @Dom But I did not ask what is good, I asked what makes people feel that something is good. That is not subjective. – Nic Szerman Aug 4 '17 at 0:00
  • From your question: "what makes a voice sound good?" That's your interpretation of good. You and I could have different options of what voices sound good so even if you objectively identify qualities of voices you think sound good then it's not guaranteed qualities that others will like. – Dom Aug 4 '17 at 0:27
  • @Dom But I did not mention this or that voice, I said a voice; the reasons why I like some voice may be different than the reasons why X likes another voice, but there are always reasons, and my question is what are the possible reasons one can have. This assumes there is a finite amount of reasons. – Nic Szerman Aug 4 '17 at 1:51
  • There may be a finite amount of reasons, but there are way too many and most if not all will be countered by another on the same list. So it's still completely opinion based and even if it wasn't it's way too broad. – Dom Aug 4 '17 at 3:30
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No - good is entirely subjective, so the question is immediately off topic here.

  • I did not ask what is good, I asked what makes people feel that something is good. That is not subjective. – Nic Szerman Aug 4 '17 at 0:01
  • Yes it is. There is nothing in music that all people like, or that all people dislike. I mean I dislike almost everything about Pop music, but there are many people who like it. Subjective. – Doktor Mayhem Aug 4 '17 at 5:35
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    @NicSzer "what makes people feel" Isn't that practically the definition of "subjective"? – Todd Wilcox Aug 8 '17 at 22:31
  • @Todd Wilcox subjectivity is often tied with emotions, but correlation does not imply causation – Nic Szerman Aug 9 '17 at 23:18
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    @NicSzer Note that criteria for on/off topic here are based on correlation, not causation. – Todd Wilcox Aug 29 '17 at 17:33

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