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One of The 7 Essential Meta Questions of Every Beta.

Robert Cartaino has made an article, here is a small slice of it:

Instead of stressing out over the vagaries of the brutal, cut-throat .com domain market and debating the “least worst” domain name options ad nauseam, simply focus on telling the world what your community is about. Don’t even think about the domain name!

Give us the one sentence “elevator pitch” for your community. How would you explain your site to a stranger you met on an elevator? It’s about … what, exactly?

Stack Overflow Blog - Domain Names: The Wrong Question

For more insight I've wrote a detailed post about Elevator Pitches in the past.

As it helps to define the site we should be starting this early, here is the post he made on other sites:

Let's start with a killer "elevator pitch!"

The Elevator Pitch

This isn't as easy as it sounds. Imagine the user who will never read your FAQ and you have two seconds to grab their attention. It should be catchy but descriptive. It should be thoroughly clear but painfully concise. Make every... word... count.

Here are some creative examples:

  • Gawker: Daily Manhattan media news and gossip. Reporting live from the center of the universe.
  • Gizmodo: The gadget guide. So much in love with shiny new toys, it’s unnatural.
  • Autoblog: We obsessively cover the auto industry.
  • DumbLittleMan: So what do we do here? Well, it’s simple. 15 to 20 times per week we provide tips that will save you money, increase your productivity, or simply keep you sane.
  • Needcoffee.com: We are the Internet equivalent of a triple espresso with whipped cream. Mmmm…whipped cream.

Use it as a Tagline

A shorter elevator pitch can be used as a tagline — something you can display in the header at the top of the page. If it doesn't fit, consider shortening it or creating a separate tagline. Here are some great examples:

The Motto (don't forget your logo)

A logo begs for it own little, short tagline — like a motto. Maybe the tagline inspires the logo; Maybe it's the other way around. Mottos make good t-shirt, bumper stickers, and other marketing material. Either way, you'll recognize a good motto when you see it:

  • Just do it.
  • Think Different.
  • The Uncola.
  • Intel inside.
  • Like a rock.
  • The king of beers.

…and perhaps all this leads to a proper name and domain for your site… eventually. So let's start from the basics. Come up with a killer elevator pitch, tagline, and/or motto!

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This site is for people who want to learn and share knowledge about music, whether they are professional musicians, students, or non-practitioner enthusiasts.

Questions can be about practice and playing, but it is not restricted to it. Objectively answerable questions about instruments, history, theory, scientific research about music and the cultural impact of music are also on-topic.

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    I seriously think we should make this a stack about music in general and not restrict to practice and performance. Being too restrictive is what has killed many budding stacks before. Therefore +1 to this proposal. – Raskolnikov May 16 '11 at 9:35
  • +1 @Raskonikov: Indeed, and I think that the name "Musicians" covers that well... :) – Tamara Wijsman May 16 '11 at 12:17
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This site is the place to go for thoughtful questions and answers about practicing and performing music. It welcomes serious amateurs (and hopes to attract some professionals) to share their experiences in mastering their instrument, sorting out musical puzzles, and caring for and feeding their instruments and collaborators.

Don't come here to debate the relative merits of genres or to play 'name that tune'. Do come here if you need some advice in making your left hand quieter than your right hand or can't figure out how to get the kibbles out of your double-bass.

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